Home About Services Clients Case studies News Contact This Summer’s Best Beach Reads – The Radleys

The original TV Book Club is back, boasting a short list of authors who include a major motion picture writer and producer, Sweden’s top selling writer and a Pulitzer Prize winner.

The eight selected titles in this Summer’s series will be reviewed on a weekly basis as part of the TV Book Club’s Summer Read strand, which recommends books perfect for holiday getaways. New to this run are exclusive profile interviews with of some the world’s biggest authors including Philip Pullman, Ken Follett, Jackie Collins, Joanne Harris, Jilly Cooper and Jacqueline Wilson.

This week’s title is The Radleys by Matt Haig airing on Sunday 7 August 2011

About the Book

The Hidden Child is a deeply satisfying, complex psychological thriller that takes place in contemporary Sweden but with a nail-biting back-story set during the Second World War. At its root is a terrible tragedy stemming from the darkest days of the Second World War, but the scourge of modern fascism, dysfunctional families, small-town hypocrisy, and psychological abuse all play their part in the unfolding drama. Camilla Lackberg’s extraordinary skill lies in producing a riveting, chilling, dramatic and very moving crime novel which has, at its core, genuine warmth and humour.

Crime writer Erica Falck is shocked to discover a Nazi medal among her late mother’s possessions. Haunted by a childhood of neglect, she resolves to dig deep into her family’s past and finally uncover the reasons why.

Her enquiries lead her to the home of a retired history teacher. He was among her mother’s circle of friends during the Second World War but her questions are met with bizarre and evasive answers. Two days later he meets a violent death. Detective Patrik Hedström, Erica’s husband, is on paternity leave but soon becomes embroiled in the murder investigation. Who would kill so ruthlessly to bury secrets so old?

Reluctantly Erica must read her mother’s wartime diaries. But within the pages is a painfulrevelation about Erica’s past. Could what little knowledge she has be enough to endanger her husband and newborn baby? The dark past is coming to light, and no one will escape the truth of how they came to be…

You can also catch last week’s title on repeat, The Hidden Child by Camilla Läckberg airing on Saturday 6 August

About the Book

Midday, 13th May, 1784: An earthquake in Peru tears up the white streets of Arequipa. As the dust settles, a young girl with fanaticism already branded on her face arrives at the devastated convent of Santa Catalina. At the same moment, oceans away in Venice, the infant Minguillo Fasan tears his way out of his mother’s womb. The great Palazzo Espagnol, built on Peruvian silver and New World drugs, has an heir.

Twelve years later, Venice is in Napoleon’s sights and Minguillo, who has already contrived to lose one sibling, is listening to the birth-cries of his new sister Marcella, a delicate, soft-skinned threat to his inheritance. Meanwhile, at Santa Catalina, the scarred young girl has become Sor Loreta, whose craving for sainthood is taking a decidedly sinister turn. Minguillo’s livid jealousy will condemn his sister to a series of fates as a cripple, a madwoman and a nun.

But Marcella Fasan is not quite the soft target Minguillo imagines. Aided by a loyal servant, an irascible portrait-painter, a young doctor obsessed with skin, a warhorse of a Scottish merchant and a cigar-smoking pornographer nun, Marcella pits her sense of humour, her clever pencil and her fierce heart against Minguillo’s pitiless machinations. Her journey takes her from Napoleon’s shamed Venice to the last picaresque days of colonial Peru – where the fanatical Sor Loreta has plans of her own for the young girl from Venice. Bewitching, daring, darkly humorous and alive with historical detail, The Book of Human Skin is a breathtaking story of unmitigated villainy, Holy Anorexia, quack medicine, murder, love and a very unusual form of bibliomania.

To find out more visit www.tvbookclub.co.uk

_Comment on this post

You must be logged in to post a comment.